Absolute Sums

The sum of the experience is not represented by the symbol by which the experience is identified. In other words the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. How is this possible? Does this not say that mathematics is useless? Yes. In many cases it does. In other cases it works just fine.

If what you are seeking in a symbol is the bottom line of a balance sheet in dollars and cents, then the wisdom is to rely on the sum. If you are counting the number of sheep in widely separated flocks, then the sum of the parts is completely sufficient.

However, if you are seeking a sum of the benefits or detriments of the positive or negative result of the balance sheet, then more—much more—than the gross total must be taken into account.

If you seek to measure in any worldly way the sum benefits of days spent in church, the number of prayers offered up, or the measure of works performed in the name of God, then you may very well come up with an actual number, but you will be badly mistaken in the final calculation, because it is not possible to calculate such a figure while you are still sucking wind, and it is not you who makes the final tally.

The score-keeper is God. Any actions attempting to come to a figure that does not take the final score-keeper into account will result in a null value. The works or actions in the balance sheet must be prefaced by a faithful understanding that it is not you who initiates the action. If you are doing it right, then you will do it because you must. The score-keeper is the initiator—you are merely the agent. If they are initiated by you, then the total rings up as invalid in the eternal sense. You lose.

It is a law of infinite (immeasurable) absolutes.

Count on it.

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